General Questions

What is your financial policy?

Our goal is to provide our patients with the best dental care possible at the most reasonable cost. Payment for care is due at the time of service unless other arrangements have been made in advance. To help you, we offer a variety of payment options including cash, check, VISA, MasterCard, Discover, and CareCredit®.

If you need special financing, CareCredit® is available in our office. CareCredit® allows you to choose from a variety of payment plans that permit you to pay for your treatment over time, while receiving the treatment that you need today. To apply for CareCredit® online, click here. You may also call (800) 365-8295 to apply by phone.

If at any time you have questions regarding your account, please contact us. Many times a simple telephone call will clear up any misunderstandings.

Do you give a discount for cash payment in full?

No.

Are periodontal treatments generally covered under Medicare or Medicaid?

Unfortunately, Medicare does not cover any dental treatments at this time; only medical treatments are covered. Medicaid programs are run by each individual state, so coverage is going to vary depending on which state you live in. Check with your dental care provider to determine if the periodontal treatment you need is covered by your plan.

Do you offer weekend or evening hours?

Not at this time.

Do you treat children?

Yes, we do. We advise that children learn the importance of keeping their teeth and gums healthy at a young age, as to prevent periodontal disease in the future. Children should brush their teeth twice a day and learn how to floss properly- if children learn how to floss at an early age, they will be more likely to make it a lifetime habit. These two simple acts will help protect their teeth and gums from periodontal disease.

As a parent, you should also be aware of the warning signs of periodontal disease, which include red, swollen, bleeding gums or bad breath that won’t go away. If your child develops any of these symptoms, tell your dental professional right away. It’s also a good idea to ensure your dental professional knows your complete family history, as genetics can play an important role in the early development of periodontal disease.

Periodontics

Other than diagnose and treat gum disease, what else have periodontists been trained to do?

Most periodontists spend the majority of their time diagnosing and treating gum disease, but there are a variety other procedures that they are able to perform. Periodontists place dental implants when natural teeth cannot be saved. They also monitor the implants to make sure that they’re properly doing their job. Periodontists may also correct gum recession and cover up exposed root surfaces which can be unsightly as well as sensitive to hot and cold. These procedures are often used to lay the foundation for additional cosmetic procedures to help create a beautiful smile. Finally, periodontists can be integral in the comprehensive planning of your oral care, along with your general dentist or other dental professional.

What are common signs and symptoms of periodontal disease?

Periodontal disease is often silent, meaning symptoms – particularly pain – may not appear until an advanced stage of the disease. However, you should still be on the lookout for the signs and symptoms, which include:

  • Red, swollen or tender gums or other pain in your mouth
  • Bleeding while brushing, flossing, or when eating certain foods
  • Gums that are receding or pulling away from the teeth, causing the teeth to look longer than before
  • Loose or separating teeth
  • Pus between your gums and teeth
  • Sores in your mouth
  • Persistent bad breath
  • A change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
  • A change in the fit of partial dentures

If you notice any of these symptoms, be sure to contact your dentist or periodontist right away!

What can I do at home to prevent periodontal disease?

The best way to prevent periodontal disease is to take good care of your teeth and gums at home. This includes brushing your teeth after every meal and before bedtime, flossing at least once each day, and seeing your dentist or periodontist for regular exams twice a year. Spending a few minutes a day on preventative measures may save you the time and money of treating periodontal disease!

Who should treat my periodontal disease: my general dentist or a periodontist?

Instead of leaving your treatment to one dental professional, you should consider having both your general dentist and a periodontist be actively involved in the diagnosis and treatment of your periodontal disease. This team approach will help your general dentist (who is familiar with your dental and medical history) and your periodontist (who has extensive experience treating periodontal disease) collaborate to tailor a treatment plan that works best for your individual case.

I was recently diagnosed with periodontal disease. How often should I see my periodontist for an examination?

Most periodontists spend the majority of their time diagnosing and treating gum disease, but there are a variety other procedures that they are able to perform. Periodontists place dental implants when natural teeth cannot be saved. They also monitor the implants to make sure that they’re properly doing their job. Periodontists may also correct gum recession and cover up exposed root surfaces which can be unsightly as well as sensitive to hot and cold. These procedures are often used to lay the foundation for additional cosmetic procedures to help create a beautiful smile. Finally, periodontists can be integral in the comprehensive planning of your oral care, along with your general dentist or other dental professional.